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Stewardship

Do You Suffer With Affluenza? [Video]

If you’re plagued with the pervasive malady of Affluenza, don’t worry. Effective remedies do exist…

Quite possibly you’re sitting there wondering “What in the world IS Affluenza?” I did too when I first heard of it! INfluenza I knew all too well! But I had only just heard of Affluenza, a term mainly used by critics of consumerism. Here’s how it’s described in the book, Affluenza: The All-consuming Epidemic.

Affluenza: a painful, contagious, socially transmitted condition of overload, debt, anxiety, and waste resulting from the dogged pursuit of more.

Affluenza:
The All-consuming Epidemic

Symptoms of Affluenza

Affluenza is brought on when consumerism encourages the acquisition of goods and services in ever-increasing amounts. Throwing things out instead of fixing them. Or buying even when we don’t need anything.

Some telltale symptoms are: an addiction to shopping, a need to accumulate more and more, and a feeling that you’re never able to keep up with it all.

The illusive dream of Affluenza is a dismantler of peace, joy, and satisfaction. While also creating a false sense of security. It seeks to convince us that a certain level of affluence will automatically ensure our well-being, satisfaction, and happiness.

Affluenza and stewardship

But Affluenza is, above all, bad stewardship. Everything we possess comes from God, and he expects us to use it well and wisely. He wants us to make every penny count. To give more and do more both for others and for his kingdom.

And likely most of us would like to DO more than we do, GIVE more than we give. But how? It often seems we barely have enough as it is. Both of time and finance.

Could it be that Affluenza gets in our way? Are we concentrating too much on living the dream and the dogged pursuit of more? And letting it eat away at our time, finance, and focus?

Never enough

Affluenza tries to convince us that we don’t have enough, even when we have way too much! It pushes us to endlessly chase after more, in an illusive and fading dream of wealth and happiness. A dream that ends up eating into our time, finance, and focus.

Not that having dreams is bad. Wanting a good and decent life for ourselves and our families is normal, and an important part of family responsibility. But part of family responsibility is to also teach our kids the excellence of contentment, gratitude, serenity, and purpose.

By choosing a life of intentional simplicity, we can escape the Affluenza plague. Try these simple steps to keep yourself from being a victim!

3 antidotes that combat Affluenza

1. Develop an attitude of gratitude.

  • Let’s stop comparing ourselves and what we have (or don’t have) with others.
  • Count (literally) our blessings, our achievements, our progress.
  • Become consciously grateful for what we do have and what the Lord has helped us accomplish.

2. Cultivate a heart of contentment.

  • Don’t shop just to shop.
  • Learn to be satisfied with what God has given.
  • Learn to live with less and to find contentment in that freedom.
  • Remember that we can’t (and shouldn’t) have everything. Where would we put it anyway?

3. Nurture a generous spirit.

  • Remember that giving is so much better than getting, getting, getting.
  • It is more blessed to give than to receive.
  • We can’t keep things forever anyway.
  • God loves the cheerful giver.

We can have too much stuff, but we can never give too much. And we can never have enough gratitude, contentment, generosity, love, joy, peace, and other true riches!

And now watch the following Affluenza documentary. It’s a bit dated, and while I don’t agree with it totally, it still offers some great food for thought. And can help us keep the following Scripture in mind.

Beware! Keep yourselves from covetousness, for a man’s life doesn’t consist of the abundance of the things which he possesses.

Luke 12:15 WEB

Image credits: Medicines | Luxury stairs | Woman shopping |

10 replies on “Do You Suffer With Affluenza? [Video]”

Great post Sheila. God does love a cheerful giver. I’d love to repost this on my blog tomorrow if that is okay. Some of the stuff I find myself hanging onto just needs to be tossed out! Maybe God also loves it when we toss away what we can’t give away!

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Thanks Pastor Pete. Sorry I didn’t see your comment earlier. We’ve been traveling. But if you’d still like to you can reblog this. And yes, I find being a cheerful giver makes a huge difference. And that tossing helps too. Having less clutter (mental, spiritual, and physical) frees me to concentrate on more important things! And of course also equals less cleaning time!!

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Well said, my friend! And I think all the harshness in the world has brought people to the point where they think things will satisfy. Where accumulation becomes a control issue. I love your antidotes–especially cultivating a generous spirit. Giving always seems to satisfy my heart more than getting. Thanks, Sheila!

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I think you’re right, Dayle. I think with the harshness that’s out there people are feeling more and more deluded by those around them. But I know from personal experience that stuff cannot bring lasting satisfaction. These antidotes have worked for me, so I hope others will give them a try too! A satisfied heart is worth much more than a stuffed house and garage!

Liked by 1 person

A very wise post !
Affluenza definitely is another epidemic of our times.
And, a symptom of affluenza is a lack of contentment.

This is an important new vocabulary word ! A synonym might be ‘greedy’.

Thanks, Signora Sheila ! 🤗

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Thanks Sally, you’re so right. And I’m afraid this epidemic is here to stay. 😦 Or at least until we realize that we have it, how harmful it can be, and decide that enough is enough! Contentment brings much more peace and fulfillment. May we chase that instead!!

Liked by 1 person

May we chase contentment indeed. I think that Affluenza is another word for greed, and we know that the greedy are never content.
Blessings and peace to you. 🤗🌷

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