Cilento’s Caciocavallo Cheese

This Italian delicacy is sure to keep you coming back for more!

Caciocavallo cheese, made from the milk of the famous Podolica cattle of southern Italy, is hard to beat! Hubby’s area in Cilento (in the mountains of Salerno) is full of these grass-fed cows. The meat is 100% organic, only grass-fed and so good. And the cheese! Well, it’s simply out of this world!

This ancient cheese was first mentioned by Hippocrates, who reported it being made and eaten by the Greeks. And to me it’s nearly a symbol of Cilento. My father-in-law always had it on hand, because he received the cheese forms as payment for renting his pasture land out to farmers for their sheep, goats, or Podolica cattle!

Caciocavallo means “horse cheese”.

Cilento’s Podolica cattle

Not that it’s made from horse milk, but due to the fact that two cheese forms are often tied together with rope and then hung or dangled to dry by placing them over a horizontal stick or branch called a cavallo (which means horse or sitting astride something).

It’s a semi-soft pale yellow cheese with a slightly strong, earthy aroma and a stringy, springy texture. Since it’s 100% natural, even the rind is edible and good. And the salty, sharp, and tangy flavor goes well with bread, olives, and red wine, making a wonderful and light evening meal!

Caciocavallo ages well.

And after aging it’s also great to take on trips, even horseback, because its slightly hardened rind helps it keep better! And flavor only improves and deepens with age, taking on a slightly fruity flavor.

If you can find some, we highly recommend it! And for a special treat, slice and brown it in a slightly oiled (extra-virgin olive oil, of course) frying pan. Cast iron works best. Warm and melted it’s almost a heavenly delight, and especially good with Bruschetta!

I only wish posts could include samples of the taste and smell! For I just know you would truly love it!

Images are mine.

Author: Signora Sheila

American born, Italian at heart. In Italy 30+ years. I'm glad you're here and hope you'll join my journey!

12 thoughts on “Cilento’s Caciocavallo Cheese”

  1. I wish your post could include samples too!! : ) But we just might be able to find some at one of the specialty stores our city has to offer. I’ll have to look for it. P.S. The Cheese Council of Italy (f there is such a thing) should put you on their advertising team!!

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    1. I hope you can find some in one of your specialty shops, Nancy! I’m sure you’d love it!! As far as being on the Cheese Council, I guess my love of cheese shows. But unfortunately, I’ve developed an intollerance to milk products. 😦 So I have to be careful and allow only occasional treats. Hopefully it will gradually disappear. Sometimes after a period of absence they seem to. Anyway, I’m sure keeping my fingers crossed for it!!

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      1. I have to limit my intake of cheese too because of the fat and salt content. I try to view food restrictions as good exercise for my self-control muscle! As my dad used to say, “Getting old is not for sissies!”

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        1. Hey, my dad used to say that too!! And I agree, it is a great exercise in self-control. In fact, a definition I once read stated that self-control meant eating just one potato chip. I could relate to that as a salty food lover. Chips are usually my downfall. 😦

          Liked by 1 person

    1. I really wouldn’t know Dayle. We’ve been gone from there for so long. But I would imagine in places like New York city you could. And at any rate, you’re always welcome to come over and have some with us!!

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